The Art of Writing

A Writers Retreat in Tuscany

Best Places to Write in Florence

Some writers are born with the ability to nurture their ideas. They can make their idea seedling flower without reading writing books or blogs or searching out tips and tricks on the net. Other writers (like me) need to acquire the knowledge of how to make their ideas blossom, stay creative b1e0fa42931bacb63887906c2b6271f4when they can feel as though they are scraping the bottom of their ideas barrel. If you’re anything like me, you’ll have to learn your ‘happy triggers’ to help increase creativity and become skilled at knowing when you’re sinking into a creative abyss. You’ll have to understand why your creativity no longer flows and set about fixing that.

We want to push our creative selves to produce, pump out good stuff every time we sit in front of our computers. But artists do reach an ‘empty level,’ a point where they are no longer able to mentally or psychologically generate stories or paintings.

Try to understand your mind, heart and soul cues to recognize when you’re running out of inspired thought, artistic energy or inventive petrol. Don’t be hard on yourself or put yourself down. Work out what makes you happy and go and do, see or feel what makes you happy.

Getting out of the house/office helps me enormously. Here are some of the places in Florence with Wifi. Sometimes I go for inspiration, sometimes I go just to re-boot, by getting out of my home office:

4174319194_f6ec4d8da4_bFlorence National Central Library

Always a classic place to pull in inspiration from the thousands of authors whose books surround you. Don’t forget you can also head over to the Cafeteria delle Oblate, on the Library’s second floor. It’s also one of the best places to soak in a view of the Duomo.

Caffe Letterario Le Murate

Formerly a prison of Florence, it’s now a spot where students or writers can go to study (or write) all day. On warmer days, you can even enjoy the outdoor patio.

Arnold’s Cafe

An American-style cafe in the historic centre of Florence, it’s great for writers visiting the area who crave an American coffee or who are in need of reliable WiFi.

Libri Liberi Sit’N’Breakfast

A wonderful cafe near the Università degli Studi di Firenze with everything a writer could ask for: indoor and outdoor seating, wifi, printer and scanner, plugs, and of course, fresh food, coffee, and pastries. You can buy an hour, a day, a week, or a month.

Brac

Less then a five minute walk from the Duomo, this contemporary art library and cafe-restaurant is designed for you to eat and read. It is also the best vegetarian restaurant in Florence.

Hemingway cafe

Located on the south side of the Arno river, Hemingway cafe is a little off the beaten path. But that’s why I love it even more. This cozy little cafe was made with writers in mind, if the cafe’s name is any indication.

Remember, finding Wifi in Florentine cafes is not easy. If you’re willing to forego Wifi for a day, though, I suggest Parco delle Cascine and Boboli Gardens behind the Medici Palace. All are beautiful parks that will surely inspire you to write.

In a few weeks I’ll follow this Blog up with more ideas on where you can go in Florence to inspire the artist in you.

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2 Comments

  1. Lovely list Lisa – I must visit some of these cafés in the centre.
    Hemingway is one of my locals and they specialise in Chocolate – both to drink and eat – so a very self-indulgent location!
    The Cascine Park is a great place to run, which I find is an exercise that also helps clarify my thoughts.
    One of best places to sit and think in the Park is the fountain in the woods that has a plaque on it noting that this was the place where Percy Bysse Shelley sat and wrote his famous poem “Ode to the West Wind” – Inspiration indeed!

    • Hi Penny,
      yes and you ought to know all the fab places here in Florence because you’ve lived here for so many years! We must meet for a hot chocolate in Hemingway’s soon, big hugs, Lisa

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